A Sheriff And A Doctor Team Up To Map Childhood Trauma

The University of Florida’s Dr. Nancy Hardt has an unusual double specialty: She’s both a pathologist and an OB-GYN. For the first half of her career, she brought babies into the world. Then she switched — to doing autopsies on people after they die.

“I want to prevent what I’m seeing on the autopsy table. … A lot of times, I’m standing there going, ‘I don’t think this person had a very nice early childhood.’ “

Dr. Nancy Hardt, pathologist, University of Florida

It makes perfect sense to her.

“Birth, and death. It’s the life course,” Hardt explains.

A few years ago, Hardt says, she learned about some research that changed her view of how exactly that life course — health or illness — unfolds.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PDF

EXPLORE MORE ARTICLES

white One Touch at 6.7 remote
Relationship Between Abuse and Neglect in Childhood and Diabetes in Adulthood
Introduction Few studies have investigated links between child abuse and neglect and diabetes mellitus in nationally representative samples, and none have explored the role of obesity in the relationship. We sought to determine whether child abuse and neglect were associated with diabetes and if so, whether obesity mediated this relationship in a population-representative sample of young …
girl covering her face with both hands
Earlier always better? Child development researchers question old assumption
It’s always worth revisiting what we think we know. In recent years, there’s been a trend among early childhood researchers to keep moving the focus to earlier and earlier in children’s lives. The storyline might go something like this: Sure, grade school matters, but we need to think about high-quality preschools to level the playing …
5 Ways Trauma-Informed Care Supports Children’s Development
Childhood trauma is common. More than two thirds of children in the United States experience a traumatic event or circumstances—such as abuse or neglect, death of a loved one, or community violence—by the time they turn 16. Young children (birth to age five), in particular, are disproportionately exposed to traumatic events and circumstances. While many children return to normal functioning after …